Running Low on Rum, Cruiser Issues "High Seas Commodity Report" | Cruising World

Running Low on Rum, Cruiser Issues "High Seas Commodity Report"

"Cruising Post" from our December 2006 CW Reckonings

CPRouner

It's a wise cruiser who keeps track of rations on a long distance passage, but a cruiser who issues a "High Seas Commodity Report"? We're not quite sure what that is.

In early November, Bob Rouner and his friend Jimmy began sailing Rouner's newly-purchased 45-foot sloop from Puerto Rico to Galveston, Texas. Somewhere south of Isla Mujeres, Mexico, Rouner emailed friends and family with the following analysis of rations and crew morale:

Dateline: High Seas
1700 Wed. Nov 1, 2006

Capt. Bob and first mate chief petty officer Jimmy recently released their monthly commodity report and short term forecast. Peanut butter and popcorn remain at record levels despite their popularity, however we expect availability to decline in the near term. Ham and swiss cheese continue to be offered daily despite the lack of enthusiasm in the consumer sector for these items. Stouffer's is holding up well but levels are declining at a rapid pace and a shortage is expected sooner than expected.

More troubling is the beverage sector. After a recent inventory, it was discovered that beer and rum levels have declined rapidly and the current supply is far less than previously believed. Although demand for these items has been strong, the distribution channels for these items is restricted. This could have a negative downstream effect on other sectors as mentioned below.

Patience and good humor have been adequate despite unfavorable conditions, and it is uncertain what impact the problems in the beverage
sector will have on these items.

Although there has been no demand, rain has been abundant and this trend is expected to continue. While polls indicate a very strong demand for sunshine, there is little to no product currently available, and this, along with the unfavorable forecast for the beverage sector, is putting downward pressure on patience and humor.

Despite the long term positive trend documented over the last 100 years for constant and readily available trade winds, this item is missing and all reports indicate a highly unusual absence for this item. Initial studies indicate that this could be responsible, in part,
for the current low levels in the beverage sector. Further comparisons and study will be undertaken. The combination of lack of resupply in the beverage sector, weak sunshine, oversupply of rain, and the downward trend in patience and humor indicates a negative outlook for the near short term forecast. Adding to this negative trending is the possibility of strong cold fronts that could further disrupt patience and humor.

Further complicating matters is the possibility of fuel shortages, but our current review of the available supply remains cautiously optimistic. In conclusion, overall there is a positive outlook for November, although as noted above there are some obstacles to overcome.

223 miles SSE of Isla Mujeres Mexico, anticipated arrival Friday morning around 9 a.m., or about the same time that a cold front slams into the area.