Sail Green: Keeping the Caribbean Blue

Groups are working hard to turn the tide away from trash and waste in this jewel of the Northern Hemisphere.

I can’t think of a more perfect vantage point in the Caribbean than that of having an island — any island — in sight after a long voyage offshore. At a distance, seeing a necklace of verdant hills evokes a feeling that the islands are immaculate green oases in the middle of a vast turquoise ocean.

And in some respects, certain islands remain this way. But others, we’ve found upon closer inspection, are under heavy pressure from overdevelopment and shortsighted thinking. Recycling? Not quite there yet. Wastewater? Straight into the ocean. And as for the diesel fuel necessary to power island generators, let’s not even start.

But bemoaning the industrial development of the Caribbean is too easy. Instead, we should celebrate the existence of Caribbean environmental groups that work tirelessly to keep their waters blue.I can’t think of a more perfect vantage point in the Caribbean than that of having an island — any island — in sight after a long voyage offshore. At a distance, seeing a necklace of verdant hills evokes a feeling that the islands are immaculate green oases in the middle of a vast turquoise ocean.

And in some respects, certain islands remain this way. But others, we’ve found upon closer inspection, are under heavy pressure from overdevelopment and shortsighted thinking. Recycling? Not quite there yet. Wastewater? Straight into the ocean. And as for the diesel fuel necessary to power island generators, let’s not even start.

But bemoaning the industrial development of the Caribbean is too easy. Instead, we should celebrate the existence of Caribbean environmental groups that work tirelessly to keep their waters blue.

Read more about the efforts to keep the Caribbean blue by removing trash, saving species and sailing sustainably.

Learn more about how you can help to Sail Green here.

The government of Trinidad and Tobago, which encompasses Goat Island and Little Tobago, is working on converting landfill waste to clean energy.Tyson Bottenus